Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018

Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018 – The Automobile Engineering syllabus in the Mumbai University Course in 201 revised has many subjects common with Mechanical, Electrical and Production Engineering.Some Subjects of the fifth Semester include important internal Combustion Engine, Production Process,Electrical Machines,Virtual Reality and communication Skills that need to be learned for reference writing.

Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018 Marks

Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018

Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018 Credits

Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018

Automobile Engineering Semester 5 Syllabus 2018

Internal Combustion Engines

Introduction
Heat engines; Internal and external combustion engines; Classification
of I.C. Engines; Cycle of operations in four strokes and two-stroke IC
engines and their comparative study; Scavenging and scavenging
blowers, Air standard cycles and Fuel air cycles, Variable specific heat
and its effects, Dissociation and other losses, Actual cycles, Deviation
of actual engine cycle from ideal cycle
06
02
Spark Ignition Engines
A. Carburators and fuel injection system in S I Engines : Theory of
carburetion, Simple carburetor, Essential parts of modern carburetor,
Types of carburators, Types of fuel injection systems in S I engines,
Continuous injection system, Timed injection system, Electronic FuelInjection
systems (EFIs), Advantages and disadvantages of SI engine
fuel injection system
B. Ignition Systems : Spark Plug and its requirements, Battery, Magneto,
Electronic ignition systems
C. Combustion : Combustion phenomenon in SI Engines, Ignition delay,
Flame propagation, Pressure-Crank angle diagram, Abnormal
combustion, Auto ignition, Detonation and Knocking, Factors
affecting combustion and detonation, Types of combustion chambers
12
03
Compression Ignition Engines
A. Fuel Injection Systems : Types i.e. Air injection systems,
Airless/solid injection systems, Common rail, individual pump,
distributor and unit injector etc, Injection pumps, Fuel injector, Types
of nozzle, Electronically controlled unit fuel injection system, C I
Engine Governors: necessity and characteristics
B. Combustion : Combustion phenomenon in C I engines, Stages of
combustion, Delay period, Knocking, Pressure-Crank angle diagram,
Factors affecting combustion and knocking, Types of combustion
chambers
12
04
Engine lubrication : Types of lubricants and their properties, SAE rating of
lubricants, Types of lubrication systems
Engine Cooling: Necessity of engine cooling, disadvantages of
overcooling, Cooling systems and their comparison: Air cooling,
Liquid cooling
Supercharging/Turbo-charging: Objectives, Effects on power output and
engine efficiency, Methods, Types, Limits
08
3
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
05
Engine Testing and Performance: Measurement of BP, IP, Fuel
Consumption, Air flow, BMEP, Performance characteristic of SI and
CI Engines, Effect of load and Speed on mechanical, indicated
thermal, break thermal and volumetric efficiencies, Heat balance sheet
Exhaust Emissions : Exhaust gas analysis and methods, necessity,
constituents, Air pollution due to engine exhaust, Pollution control
devices and EURO, BHARAT standards
Fuels : SI and CI engine fuels, Rating of fuels, Non conventional fuels:
CNG, LPG, Bio-fuels, Hydrogen, Alcohol etc
06
06
Alternative Potential Engines: Stratified charge engine, Wankel engine,
Free-piston engine, Stirling engine, VCR engine, Dual fuel engines,
Multi fuel engines
Modern Trends in I C Engines
04
List of Experiments
Part A: Study of physical systems in terms of constructional details and functions
1. 2 Stroke and 4 Stroke Engines
2. Carburetor.
3. Ignition system.
4. Fuel injection system.
Part B: Students shall perform at least 5 experiments from the list
1. Morse Test on petrol engine.
2. Speed Test on petrol or/and diesel engine.
3. Load Test on diesel engine (engines).
4. Heat Balance test on diesel or petrol engines.
5. Experimental determination of Air fuel ratio.
6. Exhaust Gas/Smoke analysis of S.I./ C.I. engines
7. Effect of Supercharging on Performance Characteristics of an engine

Term Work
Term work shall consist of minimum 6 experiments from the list out of which 4 must be
actual trials on IC Engines and 1 case study/report (in group of not more than 3 students) on
latest trends/developments in IC Engines
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
? Laboratory work (Experiments) : 15 marks
? Case Study/Report : 05 marks
? Attendance (Theory and Practical) : 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
laboratory work and minimum passing in the term work.

Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.

Practical/Oral examination
1. Practical examination shall be conducted in a group of not more than 5 students.
Examination shall be based on actual trials performed during the semester. Students
are expected to actually take reading and plot the performance characteristics and
comment.
2. Examiners are expected to evaluate results of each group and conduct oral based on
the same
3. The distribution of marks for practical/oral examination shall be as follows:
i. Practical performance …… 15 marks
ii. Oral …… ………………. .10 marks
4. Students work along with evaluation report to be preserved till the next examination

Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of
respective lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.

References
1. Internal Combustion Engines, Willard W.Pulkrabek, Pearson Education.
2. Internal Combustion Engines, Shyam Agrawal, New Age International
3. Internal Combustion Engine, Mathur and Sharma
4. Internal Combustion Engines, Mohanty, Standard Book House
5. Internal Combustion Engine, Gills and Smith
6. Internal Combustion Engines Fundamentals, John B. Heywood
7. Internal Combustion Engines, Gupta H N, 2nd ed, PHI
8. Internal Combustion Engine, V Ganesan – TataMcGraw Hill
9. Internal Combustion Engines, Richard Stone – Palgrave Publication
10. Internal Combustion Engine, S.L. Beohar
11. Internal Combustion Engine, P.M Heldt.
12. Internal Combustion Engines, V.L. Maleeve
13. Internal Combustion Engine, E.F. Oberi.
14. Internal Combustion Engine, Domkundwar

Metrology and Quality Engineering

01 1.1 Introduction to Metrology, Fundamental principles and definitions,
measurement standards / primary and tertiary standards, distinction
between precision and accuracy.
1.2 Limits, fits and tolerances, Tolerance grades, Types of fits, IS919,
GO and NO GO gauges- Taylor’s principle, design of GO and NO
GO gauges, filler gauges, plug gauges and snap gauges.
05
02 2.1 Comparators: Constructional features and operation of mechanical,
optical, electrical/electronics and pneumatic comparators,
advantages, limitations and field of applications.
2.2 Principles of interference, concept of flatness, flatness testing,
optical flats, optical interferometer and laser interferometer.
2.3 Surface texture measurement: importance of surface conditions,
roughness and waviness, surface roughness standards specifying
surface roughness parameters- Ra, Ry, Rz, RMS value etc., surface
roughness measuring instruments – Tomlinson and Taylor Hobson
versions, surface roughness symbols.
12
03 3.1 Screw Thread measurement: Two wire and three wire methods,
floating carriage micrometer.
3.2 Gear measurement: Gear tooth comparator, Master gears,
measurement using rollers and Parkinson’s Tester.
3.3 Special measuring Equipments: Principles of measurement using
Tool Maker’s microscope, profile projector & 3D coordinate
measuring machine.
12
04 Quality Control: Introduction, definition and concept of quality &
quality control, set up policy and objectives of quality control, quality of
design and quality of conformance, compromise between quality & cost,
quality cost and planning for quality.
07
05 SQC and SQC tools: Importance statistical methods in QC,
measurement of statistical control variables and attributes, pie charts, bar
charts/ histograms, scatter diagrams, pareto chart, GANT charts, control
charts, X chart, X bar charts, R charts, P charts, np charts their
preparation, analysis and applications. Elementary treatment on modern
SQC tools.
08
06 Sampling Techniques: Sampling inspection and basic concepts, OC
curves, consumer & producer risk, single & double sampling plans and
use of sampling tables.

List of Experiments
1. Use of comparators.
2. Thread measurement.
3. Gear measurement.
4. Use of Profile projectors.
5. Use of linear and angular measuring instruments.
6. Measurement of surface roughness.
7. Measurement of flatness.
Term Work
Term work shall consist of minimum 5 experiments from the list and presented with
inferences and one assignment on each module
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
? Laboratory work (Experiments) : 10 marks
? Assignments : 10 marks
? Attendance (Theory and Practical) : 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
laboratory work and minimum passing in the term work.
Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.

Practical/Oral examination
1. Experiment for the examination shall be based on the list of experiments mentioned in
the term work.
2. The distribution of marks for practical/oral examination shall be as follows:
i. Practical performance: 15 marks
ii. Oral: 10 marks
3. Evaluation of practical examination to be done based on the experiment performed
and the output of the experiments during practical examination.
4. Students work along with evaluation report to be preserved till the next examination
Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of
respective lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.
7

References
1. Practical Engineering Metrology, K.W.B.Sharp, Pitman Publication
2. Engineering Metrology, K.J.Hume, Kalyani publication
3. Engineering. Metrology, I.C. GUPTA, DhanpatRai Publications.
4. Statistical quality control, A.L. Grant, McGraw Hill International, New York.
5. Engineering. Metrology, R.K.Jain, Khanna Publisher.
6. Metrology,Taher.
7. Statistical Quality control, R.C. Gupta
8. I.S. 919/1963.
9. I.S. 2709/1964.
10. Engineering. Metrology, Hume K.G., M C Donald, Technical &Scientific ,London.
11. Quality Control and Industrial Statistics, – Duncon A.J., D.B. Taraporevela& Co.
Bombay.
12. Statistical quality Control, Mahajan M., DhanpatRai& Sons, Delhi.
13. Engineering Metrlogy-2nd Ed., P. Narayana, Scitech Publication.
14. Metal working & Metrology, P. Narayana et.al ,Scitech Publication.
15. Quality control 7 ed.,D.H. Besterfield Pearson education.
16. Juran’s Quality Control Handbook.

Production Process – III

Introduction to High speed machines, special purpose machines, transfer
line and other mass production machines. Types of automats and its
tooling.
04
02
Sheet Metal Forming
Elementary treatment of press working, Operation on presses, Press
devices Classification of presses, Constructional features of blanking,
piercing, compound, combination, progressive, bending, forming and
drawing dies, Load calculations, development of blanks, scrap strip
layout, punches, selection of die sets, stock guides, strippers, pilots,
stops etc. selection of presses, capacities and other details.
10
03
Design of Jigs and Fixtures
Need for jigs and fixtures, elements of Jigs and fixtures, principles of
location, design of locating elements, locating pins support pins spring
back, vee blocks, etc. principles of clamping simple hand operated
clamps, like screw clamp, lever clamps and other types of clamps. Drill
bushes-their types and applications indexing devices, auxiliary elements.
Design of drill jigs like plate, leaf solid and box types for drilling
combined with reaming, spot facing etc. design of milling fixtures such
as plain, string, gang and indexing types. Design of turning fixtures.
12
04
Non-traditional Machining
Ultrasonic Machining (USM), Abrasive Jet Machining (AJM),Water Jet
Machining, Electrochemical Machining (ECM),Chemical Machining
(CHM)Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM),Plasma Arc Machining
(PAM),Laser Beam Machining (LBM),Electron Beam Machining
(EBM), Arc cutting processes and Oxy fuel cutting process.
08
05
Plastics Injection Mold Design
General arrangement of an injection mold, Basic systems of the mold –
Feeding system, cooling system and ejection systems, Concepts of three
plate molds and tooling for moulding articles with undercuts, Concepts
of split molds, hot runner systems – Their advantages and limitation over
conventional systems. Basic concepts of mold standardization and
innovative mold components.

University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)

Agile Manufacturing Technologies
Introduction, Developing agile manufacturing, Integration of
Product/Process Development, Application of IT/IS concepts, Agile
supply chain management, Design of skill and knowledge and Computer
control of Agile manufacturing.
Flexible manufacturing systems.

Term Work
1. At least six assignments on concepts, Case studies and analysis based on the topics
mentioned above.
2. Term work shall consist of minimum 6 assignments. The distribution of marks for term
work shall be as follows
? Lab work (Case Studies): 10 marks
? Assignments: 10 marks
? Attendance: 05marks
Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.

Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of respective
lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.
References
1. Mechanical Metallurgy, G E Dieter ,McGraw Hill.
2. Jigs and Fixtures, P H Joshi, Mc Graw Hill.
3. Production Technology, R C Patel & C G Gupte.
4. Production Technology, HMT, Tata Mc Graw Hill.
5. Introduction to Jigs and Tool design, HA Kempster, Butterworth Heinemann Ltd.
6. Manufacturing Process, R A Lindberg, PHI India.
7. Agile Manufacturing- Forging Mew Frontiers, Poul T Kidd,Amagow Co. UK.
8. Agile Manufacturing, AGunasekharan, the 21st Century Competitive strategy,
Elsevier Press,India.
9. Stereo Lithography and other RP & M Technologies, Paul F.Jacobs: SME, NY 1996.
10. Rapid Manufacturing, Flham D.T &Dinjoy S.S Verlog London2001.
11. Fundamentals of modern Manufacturing, Fourth Edition, Mikell P Groover, John
Wiley & Sons.
12. Metals handbook ,Forming and Forging, Vol. 14, ASM.
10
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
Course Code Course/Subject Name Credits

Theory of Machines-II

1.1 Clutches: Requirements of Clutches, Types of Clutches and Clutch
materials, Positive clutches, friction clutches, Friction Clutches – Analysis
of frictional torque, power transmission .Power loss in Friction in single
plate, multiple plate clutch, and cone clutch, Centrifugal Clutches –
construction, working
08
02
2.1 Brakes: Requirement of brake, Types of Brakes, Analysis of Block
brakes – external and internal, Band brake-simple and differential, Band
and block brake – simple and differential, Braking of vehicles – front
wheels, rear wheels, all wheels on level and inclined roads,
2.2 Dynamometers – Absorption and transmission dynamometers, Study
and analysis of absorption type dynamometer – Proney brake, Rope brake,
dynamometers, Study and analysis of transmission type dynamometers –
Belt transmission, epicyclical, torsion dynamometers, Froude hydraulic
dynamometer
08
03
3.1 Governors: Comparison between governors and flywheel, Types –
centrifugal governors, inertia governors,
3.2 Force analysis of gravity loaded governors – Watt, Porter, Proell,
Force analysis of spring loaded governors – Hartnell, hartung, Wilson
Hartnell, Force analysis of spring and gravity loaded governor,
Performance characteristics of governors- stability, sensibility,
isochronisms, Hunting, governor effort and governor power, coefficient of
insensitiveness.
08
04
4.1 Gyroscope: Introduction – Gyroscopic couple and its effect on
spinning bodies, Gyroscopic effect on naval ships during steering,
pitching and rolling., Ship stabilization with gyroscopic effect
Two wheeler and four wheeler on curved path – effect of gyroscopic
and centrifugal couples, maximum permissible speeds on curve paths,
Gyroscopic effect due to lateral misalignment of rigid disc mounted on
shaft
08
05
5.1 Gear Trains: Kinematics and dynamic analysis of – simple gear
trains, compound gear trains, reverted gear trains, epi-cyclic gear trains
with spur or bevel gear combination.
5.2 Transmissions:
Necessity of gear box, Sliding mesh, Constant mesh, Synchromesh and
epicyclic gear box,
08
11
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
06
6.1 Static and Dynamic force analysis in slider crank mechanism
(neglecting mass of connecting rod and crank), Engine force analysis,
Turning moment on crank shaft.
6.2 Dynamically equivalent systems to convert rigid body to two mass
with and without correction couple.
6.3 Flywheel and its applications, Fluctuation in energy, function of
flywheel , estimating inertia of flywheel for reciprocating prime movers
and machines.
08
List of Experiments
1. Study of Clutches
2. Study of Brakes
3. Experiments on Dynamometers – Rope Brake Dynamometer, Torsion Dynamometer
4. Experiments on Governors – Proell Governor, Hartnell Governor,
5. Experiments on Gyroscope
6. Study of power transmission system in automobile
7. Study of Cams & Followers.
8. Plotting of displacement-time, velocity-time, acceleration-time & jerk-time for
uniform velocity, UARM, SHM &Cycloidal motion.
9. At least two numerical simulations using C++/MATLAB based on systems discussed
in syllabus
Term Work
Term work shall consist of minimum eight experiments, assignments consisting numerical
based on above syllabus, at least 3 numerical from each module.
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
? Laboratory work (Experiments) : 10 marks
? Assignments : 10 marks
? Attendance (Theory and Practical) : 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
laboratory work and minimum passing in the term work

Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.
Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of
respective lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.

References
1. Theory of Machines – Thomas Bevan – C. B. S. Publishers
2. Theory of Machines – S. S. Ratan – Tata McGraw Hill
3. Theory of Machines – P. L. Ballaney, Khanna Publishers, Delhi
4. Dynamics of Machines – Norton, McGraw Hill Publication
5. Theory of Mechanisms and Machines – A. Ghosh and A. Malik – Affiliated East –
West Press Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi
6. Theory of Machines – W. G. Green – Bluckie & Sons Ltd.
7. Mechanics & Dynamics of Machinery – J. Srinivas, Scitech
8. Kinematics, Dynamics and Design of Machinery, 2nd ed., Kenneth Waldron, Gary
Kinzel, Wiley India Edition
9. Essential MATLAB for Engineers and Scientist – Brian D. Hanhn, Daniel Valentine,
13
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
Course Code Course/Subject Name Credits

Heat Transfer

Introduction
Typical heat transfer situations, Modes of heat transfer, heat transfer
parameters, various thermo physical properties
02
02
Conduction
Fourier’s law of heat conduction, thermal conductivity, differential equation
of heat conduction with heat generation in unsteady state in the Cartesian
coordinate system, Boundary and initial conditions, Solution to three
dimensional steady heat conduction problems, Steady heat conduction in
plane walls, composite walls, Concept of thermal resistance and thermal
resistance network, Heat conduction in cylinders and spheres, Differential
equation of heat conduction in cylindrical co-ordinates, Conduction through
Cylindrical and Spherical composite walls (Derivation NOT INCLUDED for
Spherical walls), Critical thickness/radius of insulation and its importance.
10
03
Extended Surfaces
Heat transfer from finned surfaces, Types of fins, Fin equation for
rectangular fin and its solution, Fin efficiency, Fin effectiveness
Transient Heat Conduction
Lumped system analysis, One dimensional transient problems analytical
solutions, One dimensional Heisler charts
Numerical Methods in Conduction
Importance of numerical methods, Finite difference formulation of one
dimensional steady heat conduction equations
08
04
Convection
Physical mechanism of convection, Natural and Forced convection,
Velocity/hydrodynamic and Thermal boundary layer, Velocity and
temperature profile, Differential equation of heat convection, Laminar flow
heat transfer in circular pipe, constant heat flux and constant wall
temperature, thermal entrance region, Turbulent flow heat transfer in circular
pipes, Pipes of other cross sections, Heat transfer in laminar and turbulent
flow over a flat plate, Heat pipe introduction and applications, Principles of
dimensional analysis and its application in convective heat transfer,
Empirical correlations for convection, Physical significance of various
dimensionless numbers useful in natural and forced convection
10
14
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
05
Radiation
Thermal radiation, Blackbody radiation, Radiation intensity, Radiative
properties, Basic laws of radiation (Plank’s law, Kirchoff’s law, StefanBoltzman
law, Wien’s displacement law, Lambert’s cosine law, Radiation
exchange between black surfaces, Shape factor, Radiation exchange between
gray surfaces, Radiosity- Irradiation method, Radiation shield and the
radiation effect
08
06
Boiling and Condensation
Boiling heat transfer, Pool boiling, Flow boiling, Condensation heat transfer,
Film condensation, Dropwise condensation
Heat Exchangers
Types of heat exchangers, Overall heat transfer coefficient, Analysis of heat
exchangers, LMTD method, Effectiveness-NTU method, Correction factor
and effectiveness of heat exchangers
10
List of Experiments
1. Thermal conductivity of metal bar /composite wall / liquid /Insulating Material
2. Determination of contact resistance
3. Effect of area on Heat transfer
4. Radial heat conduction
5. Determination of fin efficiency and fin effectiveness
6. Unsteady state heat transfer
7. Heat pipe
8. Natural and Forced convection for flow over flat plate /through a circular pipe
9. Comparison of Overall heat transfer coefficient and effectiveness for double
pipe/plate type /shell & tube heat exchanger
10. Determination of emissivity of a grey surface

Term Work
Term work shall consist of minimum 7 experiments from the list, 3 assignments containing
numerical based on modes of heat transfer and One Assignment based on live problem
relevant to heat exchanger analysis
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
? Laboratory work (Experiments) : 10 marks
? Numerical Assignments : 05 marks
? Live problem assignment: 05 Marks
? Attendance (Theory and Practical) : 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
laboratory work and minimum passing in the term work.
Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.
15
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
Oral examination
1. Oral examination shall be conducted based on term work and syllabus content
2. Examiners are expected to give small task or ask questions either to evaluate
understanding of basic fundamentals or to evaluate their capability of applying basic
theory to practical applications.
Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of
respective lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.

References
1. Introduction to Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer, 2nd ed., Yunus A Cengel,
McGraw Hill International.
2. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, F. P. Incropera and D. P.DeWitt, Wiley
India
3. Heat and Mass Transfer, 2nd ed., R Rudramoorthy and L Mayilsamy, PEARSON
4. Fundamentals of Engineering Heat and Mass Transfer, 4th ed., R C Sachdeva, New
Age International
5. Heat Transfer, 2nd ed., A F Mills and V Ganesan, PEARSON
6. Heat Transfer, 9th ed., J P Holman, McGraw Hill
7. Engineering Heat and Mass Transfer, Mahesh M Rathore, Laxmi Publication
8. Principles of Heat Transfer, 6th ed., Frank Kreith, CENGAGE Learning
9. Heat and Mass transfer, 6th ed.,D S Kumar, S K Kataria and Sons
10. Heat Transfer, S P Sukhatme, University Press
11. Heat and Mass Transfer, 2nd
ed., P K Nag, Tata McGraw Hill
12. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, Thirumaleshwar, Pearson Education
13. Engineering Heat Transfer, N V Suryanarayana, Penram Publication
14. Heat and Mass transfer, C P Arora, Dhanpatrai and Co.
15. Heat Transfer, Y V C Rao, University Press
16. Heat and Mass Transfer, R K Rajput, S.Chand and Company
17. Elements of Heat Transfer, Jakole and Hawkins
18. Heat Transfer, James Sueee, JAICO Publishing House
19. Heat Transfer, Donald Pitts & L E Sisson, Schaums Series, Mc Graw Hill
International
20. Engineering Heat Transfer, Shao Ti Hsu
21. Heat Transfer, M Necati Ozisik, McGraw Hill International edition
22. Heat Transfer, Ghosdastidar, Oxford University Press
16
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
Course Code Course/Subject Name Credits

Business Communication & Ethics

Communication Skills

1.0 1.0 Report Writing 07
1.1 Objectives of report writing
1.2 Language and Style in a report
1.3 Types of reports
1.4 Formats of reports: Memo, letter, project and survey based
2.0 2.0 Technical Proposals 02
2.1 Objective of technical proposals
2.2 Parts of proposal
3.0 3.0 Introduction to Interpersonal Skills 07
3.1 Emotional Intelligence
3.2 Leadership
3.3 Team Buliding
3.4 Assertiveness
3.5 Conflict Resolution
3.6 Negotiation Skills
3.7 Motivation
3.8 Time Management
4.0 4.0 Meetings and Documentation 02
4.1 Strategies for conducting effective meetings
4.2 Notice
4.3 Agenda
4.4 Minutes of the meeting
17
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
5.0 5.0 Introduction to Corporate Ethics and etiquettes 02
5.1 Business Meeting etiquettes, Interview etiquettes, Professional
and work etiquettes, Social skills
5.2 Greetings and Art of Conversation
5.3 Dressing and Grooming
5.4 Dinning etiquette
5.5 Ethical codes of conduct in business and corporate activities
(Personal ethics, conflicting values, choosing a moral response,
the process of making ethical decisions)
6.0 6.0 Employment Skills 05
6.1 Cover letter
6.2 Resume
6.3 Group Discussion
6.4 Presentation Skills
6.5 Interview Skills
Total 25

List of Assignments
1. Report Writing (Synopsis or the first draft of the Report)
2. Technical Proposal (Group activity, document of the proposal)
3. Interpersonal Skills (Group activity and Role play)
4. Interpersonal Skills ( Documentation in the form of soft copy or hard copy)
5. Meetings and Documentation ( Notice, Agenda, Minutes of Mock Meetings)
6. Corporate ethics and etiquettes (Case study, Role play)
7. Cover Letter and Resume
8. Printout of the PowerPoint presentation

Term Work
Term work shall consist of all assignments from the list.
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
? Assignments : 20 marks
? Project Report Presentation: 15 marks
? Group Discussion: 10 marks
? Attendance : 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
work assigned and minimum passing in the term work.
References
1. Fred Luthans, “Organisational Behavior” , Mc Graw Hill, edition
2. Lesiker and Petit, “Report Writing for Business” , Mc Graw Hill, edition
3. Huckin and Olsen,“Technical Writing and Professional Communication”,McGraw Hill
4. Wallace and Masters, “Personal Development for Life and Work” , Thomson Learning, 12th
edition
5. Heta Murphy, “Effective Business Communication” , Mc Graw Hill, edition
6. R.C Sharma and Krishna Mohan, “Business Correspondence and Report Writing”,
7. B N Ghosh, “Managing Soft Skills for Personality Development”, Tata McGraw Hill.Lehman,
8. Dufrene, Sinha, “BCOM”, Cengage Learning, 2nd edition
9. Bell . Smith, “Management Communication” Wiley India Edition,3rd edition.
10. Dr. K. Alex ,”Soft Skills”, S Chand and Company
11. Dr.KAlex,”SoftSkills”,S Chand and Company
12. R.Subramaniam,”Professional Ethics” Oxford University Press 2013.
18
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)

Artificial Intelligence

AI and Internal Representation
Artificial Intelligence and the World, Representation in AI, Properties of
Internal Representation, The Predicate Calculus
Intelligent Agents: Concept of Rational Agent, Structure of Intelligent
agents, Agent Environments.
Problem Solving : Solving problems by searching, Problem Formulation,
Search Strategies, Uninformed Search Techniques, DFS, BFS, Uniform
cost search, Iterative Deepening, Comparing different Techniques,
Informed search methods – Best First Search, heuristic functions, Hill
Climbing, A*.IDA*. Crypt Arithmetic, Bactracking for CSP
02
Programming in LISP or PROLOG
Lisps, Typing at Lisp, Defining Programs, Basic Flow of Control in Lisp,
Lisp Style, Atoms and Lists, Basic Debugging, Building Up List
Structure, More on Predicates, Properties, Pointers, Cell Notation and the
Internals (Almost) of Lisp, Destructive Modification of Lists, The for
Function, Recursion, Scope of Variables Input/Output, Macros
06
03
Fundamentals Concepts and Models of Artificial Neural Systems
Biological Neuron and their Artificial Models, Models of ANN, Learning
and Adaptation, Neural Networking Learning Rules. Single-layer
Perception Classifiers
Multilayer Feed forward Networks : Linearly Nonseparable Pattern
Classification, Delta Learning Rule, Feed forward Recall and Error BackPropagation
Training, Learning Factor
06
04
Fuzzy Systems
Fuzzy Sets: Fuzzy Relations, Fuzzy Function, Fuzzy Measures,
probabilities possibilities. Fuzzy Modeling and applications of Fuzzy
Control. Neural and fuzzy machine Intelligence
06
05
Generic Algorithm: Simple generic algorithm, Simulation by hands,
similarity templates (Schemata), Mathematical foundations, Schema
processing at work, Two armed and k armed Bandit Problem, Building
blocks hypothesis, Minimal Deceptive Problem,
Computer implementation of generic algorithm, Data structures,
Reproduction, Cross over and mutation. Time to response and time to
cross mapping objective function to fitness from fitness scaling.
Application of generic algorithm. De Jong and Function Optimization.
Improvement in basic techniques, Improvement to genetics based machine
learning, application of genetic based machine learning
06
19
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
06
Data Mining & Information Retrieval
Data warehousing & Data Mining. Online Analytic Processing [OLAP]:
its architecture and its use. Java implementations, classification trees and
exploratory data analysis [EDA].
EDA Vs Hypothesis Testing, Computational EDA Techniques, Graphical
[Data Visualization], EDA techniques for function fitting, data smoothing,
layering, tessellations, contour projections, Verification of results of EDA.
Applications & trends in data mining.
Case Studies

Term Work
Term work shall consist of, Assignments on each module [At least 1 assignment per module].
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
1. Assignments: 20 marks
2. Attendance (Theory and Practical): 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
laboratory work and minimum passing in the term work.
Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.

Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of
respective lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.
References
1. Introduction to Artificial intelligence By Eugene Charniak, Drew McDermott
Addison Wesley
1. Artificial Neural Networks- B.Yegnanarayana, PHI, 1999.
2. Genetic Algorithms in search, Optimization & Machine Learning by David E
Goldberg-Addison wesley
3. Data Mining by Pieter Adriaans and Dolt Zantinge – Pearson Education Asia
4. Data Warehousing in the Real World by Sam Anahory and Dennis Murray.
5. Artificial Intelligence, Elaine Rich, Kevin Knight, S. Nair, McGraw Hill Publishing
Company Ltd
6. Principles of Artificial Intelligence – N.J. Nilsson, Tioga Hill, 1992.
7. Artificial Intelligence and Design of Expert Systems – C.F. Luger & W.A.
Stubblefeild, Addison-Wesley.
8. Introduction to Data Mining & Knowledge Discovery – Edelstein, Herbert A.
9. Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems – Jacek M. Zurada, Jaico Publishing House,
2001.
10. Neural Network – SimsonHaykin, Macmillan Publication, 1994.
11. Fuzzy Set Theory & its Applications – H.J.Zimmermann, Allied Publishers Ltd, 1996.
20
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
Course Code Course/Subject Name Credits

Virtual Reality 

Introduction: A short history of early virtual reality, early commercial
VR Technology, VR becomes an Industry, The five classical
components of VR Systems.
Input Devices: Trackers, Navigations and Gesture Interfaces.
Three Dimensional Position Trackers: Tracker performance
parameters, Mechanical trackers, Magnetic trackers, Ultrasonic
trackers, Optical Trackers and Hybrid Inertial Trackers Navigation and
Manipulation Interfaces: Tracker based Navigation/Manipulation
Interfaces, Trackballs, and three Dimensional Probes Gesture
Interfaces: The Pinch Glove, the 5DT Data Glove, the Didjiglove, the
Cyberglove
06
02
Output Devices: Graphical, Three Dimensional Sound and Haptic
Displays: Graphical Display: The human visual system, personal
graphics displays, large volume displays. Sound displays: the human
auditory system, the convolvotron, Speaker based three dimensional
sound. Haptic Feedback: The human haptic system, Tactile Feedback
Interfaces, Force Feedback Interfaces.
06
03
Computing Architectures for Virtual Reality: The Rendering
Pipeline: The graphical rendering pipeline, The haptics rendering
pipeline. PC Graphics Architectures: PC Graphics Accelerators,
Graphics Benchmarks. Work Station Based Architectures: the Sun
Blade 1000 Architecture, The SGI Infinite Reality Architecture.
Distributed VR Architectures: Multipipeline Synchronization,
Colocated rendering Pipelines, Distributed Virtual Environments.
06
04
Modeling: Geometric Modeling: Virtual Object Shape, Object Visual
Appearance. Kinematics Modeling: Homogeneous Transformation
Matrices, Object Position, Transformation Invariants, Object
Hierarchies, viewing the three dimensional words. Physical Modeling:
Collision Detection, Surface Deformation, Force Computation,
Force Smoothing and Mapping, Haptic Texturing. Behavior
Modeling and Model Management: Level of Detail Management, Cell
Segmentation.
06
05
Virtual Reality Programming: Toolkits and Scene Graphs. World
Toolkit: Model Geometry and Appearance, The WTK Scene Graph,
Sensors and Action Functions, WTK Networking, JAVA 3D: Model
Geometry and Appearance, Java 3D Scene graph, Sensors and
Behaviors, Java 3D Networking, WTK and Java 3D Performance
Comparison. General Haptics Open Software Toolkit: GHOST
Integration with the Graphics Pipeline, The GHOST Haptic Scene
Graph, Collision Detection and response, Graphics and PHANToM
06
21
University of Mumbai, Automobile Engineering (Third and Final Year) Revised Course (Rev-2012)
Calibration.
Human Factors in Virtual Reality: Methodology and Terminology:
Data Collection and Analysis, Usability Engineering Methodology.
User Performance Studies: Test bed Evaluation of universal VR Tasks,
Influence of System Responsiveness on User Performance, Influence of
Feedback Multimodality.
06
Traditional Virtual Reality Applications: Medical Application of
VR: Virtual Anatomy, Triage and Diagnostic and Rehabilitation.
Education, Arts and Entertainment: VR in Education, VR and, Surgery
the Arts. Entertainment Application of VR. Military VR Application:
Army use of VR, VR Application in Navy, Air Force use of VR.
Emerging Application of VR: VR Application and Manufacturing:
Virtual Prototyping, other VR Application in Manufacturing;
Application of VR in Robotics: Robot Programming, Robot Tele
operation. Information Visualization: Oil Exploration and Well
Management, Volumetric Data Visualization.
06

Term Work
Term work shall consist of, at least one (1) assignments on each module
The distribution of marks for term work shall be as follows:
? Assignments: 20 marks
? Attendance (Theory and Practical): 05 marks
The final certification and acceptance of term work ensures the satisfactory performance of
laboratory work and minimum passing in the term work.
Internal Assessment
Assessment consists of two tests out of which; one should be compulsory class test (on
minimum 40% of curriculum) and the other is either a class test (on minimum 70% of
curriculum) or assignment on live problems or course project.

Theory Examination
In question paper weightage of each module will be proportional to number of
respective lecture hours as mention in the syllabus.
1. Question paper will comprise of 6 questions, each carrying 20 marks.
2. Question number 1 will be compulsory and based on maximum contents of the
syllabus
3. Remaining questions will be mixed in nature (for example, if Q.2 has part (a) from
module 3 then part (b) will be from other than module 3)
4. Total four questions need to be solved.
References
1. GrigoreBurdea, Philippe Coiffet, “ Virtual Reality Technology” 2ndedition. Wiley
India
2. John vince, “Virtual Reality Systems” Pearson Education Asia
3. Understanding Virtual Reality, Sherman, Elsever.

AEP701 / AEP802 Project 1

Guidelines for Project
o Students should do literature survey/visit industry/analyze current trends and
identify the problem for Project and finalize in consultation with Guide/Supervisor.
Students should use multiple literatures and understand the problem.
o Students should attempt solution to the problem by experimental/simulation
methods.
o The solution to be validated with proper justification and report to be compiled in
standard format.

Guidelines for Assessment of Project I
o Project I should be assessed based on following points
? Quality of problem selected
? Clarity of Problem definition and Feasibility of problem solution
? Relevance to the specialization
? Clarity of objective and scope
? Breadth and depth of literature survey
o Project I should be assessed through a presentation by the student project group to
a panel of Internal examiners appointed by the Head of the Department/Institute of
respective Programme.
Guidelines for Assessment of Project II
o Project II should be assessed based on following points
? Quality of problem selected
? Clarity of Problem definition and Feasibility of problem solution
? Relevance to the specialization / Industrial trends
? Clarity of objective and scope
? Quality of work attempted
? Validation of results
? Quality of Written and Oral Presentation
o Report should be prepared as per the guidelines issued by the University of
Mumbai.
o Project II should be assessed through a presentation by the student project group to
a panel of Internal and External Examiners approved by the University of Mumbai
o Students should be motivated to publish a paper based on the work in
Conferences/students competitions
23